Miličević: Home is not a safe place for many women around BiH and the world

Miličević: Home is not a safe place for many women around BiH and the world

SARAJEVO, November 26 (FENA) – In 1999, the United Nations General Assembly declared November 25 as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. That date was chosen to mark the murder of Mirabal sisters, activists for democracy and justice.

Four out of ten women in Bosnia and Herzegovina have suffered psychological, physical or sexual violence, according to a survey conducted by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE).

On that occasion, the international campaign of 16 days of activism against violence against women begins.

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women and the beginning of the Global Campaign 16 Days of Activism “When Home Does Not Mean Security”, the CURE Foundation organized a street action in front of the Sarajevo Market, through which activists shared basic information about the campaign.

Speaking about the significance of this day and the “16 days of activism” campaign, activist Jadranka Miličević from the CURE Foundation says that this year started turbulently for the planet and its population due to the global pandemic caused by the COVID-19 virus.

“We have all been forced to change our daily lives and the challenges we have faced have brought additional problems in exercising women’s rights. Numerous campaigns involving the promotion of physical distancing for the purpose of protection against COVID-19 were conducted under the slogan #stayhome promoting the policy that “a home is a safe place”. But for many women around BiH and the world, home is not a safe place,“ Miličević said because isolation and physical distancing in homes meant an increased risk of domestic violence for many women.

She points out that there is no database at the entity level, let alone at the BiH level, on women who are victims of gender-based violence even before the pandemic, and especially not now.

“Globally, there should be consolidated information. There was no synchronized response of the institutions in relation to the cases of violence during the pandemic,” she underlined.

Miličević also points out that violence is a social problem and it is a big problem that the majority of BiH citizens consider violence to be a private matter, and that is how they treat victims of violence.